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Tag Archives: Tianjin Ronggang Golden Lions

Farewell, Tianjin Golden Lions

March 7, 2013

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The regular season is over and for the eight teams who finished with a good enough record to participate, the month of March will one of hope and optimism… unless you’re playing Guangdong or Beijing in the first round (as Guangsha and Zhejiang both found out). Then, maybe it’ll just be a month of collecting first-round playoff bonuses. But for those nine teams who are already relaxing at home, you’re not forgotten. Leon Zhang says goodbye to the second-worst team in the league, the Tianjin Golden Lions, in his ongoing series of CBA Farewell Letters.

It was the best half season anyone could’ve expected, and then abruptly, it was the worst. The first part of the season saw Tianjin, high upon the standings, looking to preserve a low playoff seed as a pleasant surprise — a Cinderella story in the making, a testament to what good coaching and solid import selection can do. The second was, in short, a massive flop towards the finish line.

And at the end of the season, the inevitable question is raised: Just what were you, Tianjin? Borderline contender or a historic failure?

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Plenty on the line in CBA’s final weekend

February 15, 2013

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With both a playoff spot and the individual scoring title on the line, Zhejiang’s Quincy Douby has a lot on his plate this weekend.

It goes by quickly, doesn’t it? After a week-long Spring Festival break, the Chinese Basketball Association’s 34-round regular season will come to a close this Sunday. And while Guangdong, Shandong and Beijing have already locked up the top three spots, there’s still plenty of stuff going on below them. To help everyone out, let’s go over what everyone should be watching for over these last two games.

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Beijing’s Min Lulei instructs players to attack the basket because, “We’ve got a good whistle”

January 22, 2013

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In the Chinese Basketball Association, referees are an ongoing issue. And that’s putting it nicely. Accusations and rumors of point shaving, bribes and various related corruption have all been thrown around, by fans, media and most recently, Tracy McGrady, who was ultimately fined and suspended for publicly criticizing referees.

The most recent case: Sunday’s abomination of a basketball game between Qingdao (again) and Tianjin, which ended in double overtime after 119 total fouls foul shots and six players fouled out. If you’re a CBA vet, you should know how it turned out: Qingdao, playing at home, won on a terrible end-of-game foul off the ball that sent Chris Daniels to the stripe for the two game-clinching free throws. If anyone is interested in either reliving the nightmare or experiencing it for the first time, Anthony Tao over at Beijing Cream has provided the world with video and words that vividly detail the game and the officiating.

The entire game was pathetic no doubt, but as the lessons learned long ago in CBA Officiating 101 continue to remind me: This is how it goes down here. Teams typically get a good whistle when at home, and a bad one when on the road. The degree can vary from a few calls here and there, to some key calls in crunch time all the way to the Wow, I didn’t know it was even possible to get screwed like that-type of officiating. (Of course, that rule is thrown out the window when you play Bayi, in which case you’re getting an extra bad whistle with a bad scorer’s table and an incompetent towel boy on top.)

And though that fact is known, recognized and acknowledged throughout the league in private, publicly nobody offers up even a peep for fear of punishment from the league… Unless a television camera sneaks into your huddle during a timeout and records everything your head coach is saying, which is what happened last Sunday night during Beijing’s nationally televised game against Xinjiang.

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iPhones given and taken away, iPads stolen in Round 25

January 21, 2013

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Shanghai’s joy was Jiangsu’s pain, as Gilbert Arenas’ game winner with 4.6 seconds took away a win, and an iPhone 5, from the home team. (Photo: CFP.cn)

If this comes across as a stereotype and/or if you’re offended by said potential stereotype, sorry. But in our experience, it’s true:

The Chinese love iPhones.

Yeah, iMessage, the high res camera, general ease of use and all the apps are cool. But it’s more than just the practicality of the device that makes it such an important part in China’s modern consumerism culture. The phone (as well as the iPad and all of its other iProduct relatives), which starts at CNY 5,288, or US $680, serves as an indicator of wealth and status, both of which are important inside of a society where some people like compare themselves and their things against one another. Not having an iPhone (or a nice phone in general) results in peer pressure, a phenomenon of which I found to be ridiculous until I heard this a few weeks ago from the man who I occasionally buy fried chicken from: “If I don’t buy my son an iPhone, everyone at school will bully and tease him.”

The same apparently extends to the CBA as well. Take the Qingdao Eagles, for example.

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The definitive NiuBBall.com CBA preview

November 22, 2012

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Stephon Marbury and the Beijing Ducks won the title last year… But will they have enough to repeat in 2012-13? (Photo: Osports)

Moreso than ever, the Chinese Basketball Association has become quite difficult to predict pre-season.

It’s hard to predict first of all because we generally stink at predictions, but more importantly that the league is as deep as its ever been top-to-bottom. There’s a more than a few reasons for that — more off-season player movement, more players going abroad to train in the summer, better coaching in-country, a commitment to strength and conditioning programs and better foreign players all round out the top of our list. But the end result of all that should be a very watchable and exciting league this season. Which is a good thing for us fans, of course.

Bad thing for NiuBBall’s annual predictions, however.

By our count, there’s 11 and possibly 12 teams (depending on how well you think Tracy McGrady is going to do in Qingdao) who have a shot at the playoffs. That’s well over half the league. If you think DongGuan is ready to make a jump (we do), then there are now four teams who could sport legitimate Finals cases. Building on Beijing’s buck-the-trend run to a championship last year, there appears to be a level of parody in the league. Pencilling in the top two, top four and top eight is no longer easy.

So as always, take what is about to come with a grain of salt and know that most likely this will all be very wrong.

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CBA fans: A history of throwing stuff

March 14, 2012

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(Thanks to Beijing Cream for the video)

For all of the coverage and commentary that has flooded Chinese media since Sunday’s ugly scene in Taiyuan, it’s been the three words that were smugly offered by Beijing Ducks head coach, Min Lulei, that have stuck out to me the most (which can be seen at the very end of the above video):

Hen zheng chang.

This is normal.

Shady officiating? Been there, done that. Blocking of an opposing team’s bus? Check. Throwing stuff onto the floor? Yep and then some.

The latter is so common in fact, that by our count the league has either warned or fined teams no less than nine 10 times for fan behavior this season. Go ahead see for yourself. (Big tip of the cap to my xiongdimen at hoopCHINA, whose CBA News section — an indispensable resource for all you Chinese readers out there — was huge in searching up all of this.)

December 4, 2011: Unhappy with the officiating, fans throw lighters onto the court midway through Beijing and Xinjiang’s game at Shougang Gymnasium. Beijing is fined 10,000 RMB. In another game, Shandong is warned for their fans’ bad behavior.

December 11, 2011: Fujian is fined 70,000 RMB, Fujian foreign player, Will McDonald, is suspended for one game and Shanghai head coach, Dan Panaggio, is warned by the league after an on-court fracas in the game’s final seconds. With one second left, McDonald spat in Panaggio’s face while the two were having words in front of Shanghai’s bench. McDonald later alleged that Panaggio had cursed at him. Fujian’s fans responded by pelting Panaggio and the Shanghai team with objects as they left the court.

December 23, 2011: Shanxi is warned by the CBA after a water bottle is tossed onto the court midway through their Round 15 matchup against Liaoning.

December 30, 2011: Jilin is fined 10,000 RMB for their inability to control their fans and for their criticism of in-game officials at a post-game press conference.

January 1, 2012: Liaoning is fined 30,000 RMB after their fans throw water bottles and cups at the court during Liaoning’s Round 17 game against Beijing. On the CBA official report, the league calls out stadium security for not managing the situation well. Liaoning had been warned about fan behavior prior.

January 6, 2012: Fans inside Shougang Gymnasium hurl lighters at the court for the second time this season, and Beijing is fined RMB 20,000.

January 29, 2012: Fans in Tianjin throw things onto the court after J.R. Smith’s sister, Stephanie Smith, gets into a verbal altercation with fans during Zhejiang and Tianjin’s Round 27 matchup. The team is fined 10,000 RMB.

February 12, 2012: In Round 33, Shanxi is fined 20,000 RMB after their fans throw lighters onto the court midway through the third quarter in their game against Guangdong. They weren’t the only ones upset with the referees, however. Guangdong’s players aggressively confront a referee during the fourth quarter and head coach, Li Chunjiang, is publicly criticized by the league for not keeping his players under control.

March 2, 2012: Xinjiang is warned after fans throw lighters and other objects onto the court during Game 5 of their first-round series against DongGuan. According to the CBA’s official report, fans were unhappy with the way the game was being called by the referees.

March 4, 2012: Two days after being warned by the CBA, Xinjiang is fined 10,000 RMB after fans throw lighters and other objects onto the court in protest of a bad call during Game 1 of their first-round series against Guangdong.

Meanwhile, Shanxi has been fined 60,000 RMB for Sunday’s water bottle throwing contest as the investigation continues. Judging from all of the other fines already dished out this season, the fine should act as a really huge deterrent for fans in the future.

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Soon to be extinct (maybe): The Asian Import

February 29, 2012

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Bad for fans of Chinese basketball, good for opposing players: Zaid Abbas may have played his last season in the CBA (Photo: Osports via Sina)

The Asian import rule: Instituted in 2008-09, the Chinese Basketball Association powers that be saw it within the benefit of Chinese basketball to allow the worst teams in the league to carry one Asian import player in addition to the two other normal import players. Attracting some of Asia’s best players would put the CBA on the map as the continent’s premier professional basketball league, which would improve the competition and make their Chinese players better. It’d also level out the playing field a bit and give the league more parity.

It’s been hit-and-miss over the years, but out of everything, three good players have come out of it all: ”Sam” Osama Dahglas (who played for Jilin this year, Shanxi last year), Zaid Abbas (Fujian this year, Beijing and Shanghai before that) and Michael Maadanly (Foshan). In a league that lacks watchable players, the three — all of whom are definitely watchable — are a welcome sight for China-based hoops fans.

So it’s bad news to hear the latest news out of Chinese media, which is that the league is considering abolishing the Asian import rule next season.

Optimists will bring up the same getting-rid-of-the-Asian-import-talk that dominated last year’s off-season rumor mill, and the off-season the year before as well, talk that ultimately ended with no changes to the rule.

This year, however, there has been more support than ever to do away with the rule. DongGuan’s Brian Goorjian is in favor of getting rid of Asian imports because he feels it takes playing time time away from young players, an opinion that Tianjin’s general manager shares.

And none other than Yao Ming has gone on record as saying he’s in favor of abolishing the Asian import next season, cruel words from the guy who gave Abbas his start in China two seasons ago in Shanghai. They’re even crueler when you consider he was one of the main reasons why Shanghai was able to turn itself around in 2009-10 from a nearly bankrupt six-win team into a playoff contender that nearly knocked off Guangdong in the semi-finals.

But in Yao’s case — and in a lot of other team’s cases — offing Abbas and other Asian imports from the CBA isn’t personal, it’s strictly business.

The rules on Asian imports are as follows: The four teams with the league’s worst record from the previous season are allowed to sign an Asian import in addition to the two other imports they can put on their roster. Unlike the other two imports, who are restricted to playing six combined quarters, Asian imports have no limits on their playing time, which means that technically they can play the entire game.

It’s an especially great rule for Abbas because he never gets tired, despite going dumb hard for the entire game. More minutes equals more stats, more stats equals more seasons, more seasons equals more money. All that, plus playing in Asia’s top professional league and it’s easy to understand why he’d like to continue playing in China. And it’s equally great for the team that signs him, since every team that Abbas has played for over his three-year CBA career (Shanghai, Beijing and Fujian) have all made the post-season.

But that’s where the problem is: No matter how much they sucked the year before, once a team signs Zaid Abbas, they make the playoffs. Which means a team who was in the playoffs the year before is going to be pushed out.

And now you can understand why Yao wants Abbas out: The Yao-owned Sharks, a low-budget team that doesn’t spend big on imports, feel threatened. Without Abbas last season, Shanghai missed the playoffs; this season they got in as a No. 6 seed. Likely fighting for a playoff seed again next season, Shanghai could once again be one of those teams who is pushed out of the post-season by whatever team Abbas signs for this off-season. Any team other than Guangdong, Xinjiang and Beijing probably feel threatened as well.

That’s only one layer of the issue, though. The other one is the decline of the Bayi Rockets from a once-proud dynasty into a nice fluffy doormat. Tied to the slow, gradual erosion of their star player, Wang Zhizhi, Bayi slipped off the face of the standings this year finishing the season in 14th place at 10-22. The 22 losses were the most ever in Bayi history, just one of many records for futility the team set this year. Things got so bad in fact that during the team’s nine-game losing streak, fans gave the old xia ke chant (yelled when fans want their coach to be fired) to their legendary head coach, Adijiang.

As one of the bottom four teams, Bayi normally would be eligible to sign an Asian player. Of course, as we all know, Bayi isn’t normal. They represent the People’s Liberation Army and thus aren’t allowed to sign any foreign players to their team.

In the scope of basketball, Bayi is a relic. With both the quality of Chinese and foreign players improving every year, Bayi stands no chance of ever getting back to the top of the CBA. An unavoidable sign of the times perhaps, but as Bayi still remains a national interest, going 10-22 is simply unacceptable for both team, league and maybe even country. So no — getting rid of the Asian import won’t put the Rockets back on the same level as Guangdong, but it would pull some of their competition back down to earth. And if they could find another player or two, maybe they’d get back into the playoffs.

Which brings up the age-old question of whether Abbas is good enough to be a regular non-Asian import, something that Shanghai asked in the summer of 2009 before ultimately deciding that he wasn’t.

A case could be made though for the 2011-12 NiuBBall Defensive Player of the Year (what, like there was any doubt?). Despite his offensive shortcomings, dude does play his freaking butt off during every second of every game, is capable of guarding up to three positions and rebounds the heck out of the ball. Abbas was selected for the CBA All-Star Game for the first time this year, and rightfully so if I may add. Maybe he wouldn’t put up the 25 points per game that most teams are looking to get out of their imports, but would anyone be surprised by nightly tallies of 18 points and 15 boards?

Abbas isn’t happy with what he’s been hearing and sounds like a guy who’s resigned to his fate — all the more reason to believe that this is going to happen.

Unfortunately, at least the way I see it, no team in China would be willing to sign him as a regular import player. There’s always a guy out there, with out without experience in China, who teams feel can put up huge scoring numbers. And at the end of the day, that’s what teams want — guys who can put up huge scoring numbers. Which means, sadly, we may have seen the last of Abbas, Dahglas and Maadanly in the CBA.

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CBA Round 34 Recap

February 16, 2012

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Beijing – 94 @ Guangsha – 114

For a full recap, check out Edward Bothfeld’s report from Hangzhou.

Box Score

Qingdao – 101 @ Foshan – 107

Guangsha’s win put Qingdao’s late season playoff surge permanently to rest, but Qingdao ultimately buried themselves by losing their must-win game at Foshan. Marcus Douthit lead all Dralion scorers with 27 points and grabbed eight rebounds. Michael Maadanly had 25 points, 11 boards and three assists. Lester Hudson shot a miraculous 35 shots, 20 of which were threes, en route to 34 points. Hudson finishes the season as the CBA’s second leading scorer at 33.5 points per game.

Jon Pastuszek

Box Score

DongGuan – 114 @ Shanxi – 124

In the battle for third place, Shanxi were the ones who came away with the big win. Charles Gaines dominated with a 41 points, 10 rebound game; a performance only slightly more dominant than Marcus Williams’ 37 points and 10 rebounds. The win gives the Brave Dragons their first ever playoff matchup against Shanghai, while DongGuan will be matched up against Xinjiang.

Jon Pastuszek

Box Score

Fujian – 79 Xinjiang – 104 

Tim Pickett played all 48 minutes and scored 42 points as the Flying Tigers made it a blowout by outscoring their opponent 32-15 in the fourth quarter. With the win, Xinjiang finishes the season in fourth place. Fujian drops to eighth.

Jon Pastuszek

Box Score

Shanghai – 89 @ Tianjin – 85 

If there was ever a game that summed up the madness and drama of Chinese basketball, tonight was it. Shanghai got the victory- thanks to the uber-clutch Marcus Landry- but it was painfully close. However, what’s important now is that the boys from the Yuanshen are coming home with an 18-14 record before they return to north China to play the Shanxi Dragons in the first round of the playoffs.

As the game drifted into the final moments, the Sharks, having been down by around five points for most of the final quarter, suddenly burst into life and a splurge of well-taken opportunities brought Shanghai within a trey of the lead and Landry, lurking unmarked on the far left of the perimeter, had one more big shot left in the locker. Taking a couple of seconds to compose himself, the former New York Knick then dispatched his effort from downtown to give the Sharks an 86-85 lead with barely thirty seconds left.

When Zhang Nan failed his own moment of truth, the Lions had to give away cheap visits to the free-throw line to get the ball back. Harris converted both of his shots while Meng Lingyuan polished off his second effort and the Sharks were 89-85 winners at the death. Zhang Nan and Herve Lamizana both helped themselves to 22 points whilst Landry got 21 for Shanghai. Zhang Zhaoxu (19), Liu Wei (13), Mike Harris (12) and Liu Ziqiu (11), also made double-digit hauls.

Andrew Crawford

Box Score

Bayi – 91 @ Guangdong – 92

Guangdong added on to Bayi’s historically miserable season by doling out their franchise worst 22 loss of the season. Aaron Brooks played only six minutes, andJames Singleton played well below his normal burn with 24 minutes. Singleton managed 26 points and 12 boards, anyways.

Jon Pastuszek

Box Score

Liaoning – 103 @ Zhejiang – 90

J.R. Smith’s last game in China ended with 25 points, 11 boards and another L as Liaoning was able to come up with a rare win away from home.

Jon Pastuszek

Box Score

Jilin – 127 @ Jiangsu – 142

Jon Pastuszek

Box Score

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NiuBBall Water Cooler/Heater: Guangsha’s Woes, Looming NBA Paydays And The Best Basketball Jerseys In China

February 11, 2012

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The NiuBBall water cooler/heater: Where you can chat with friends about hoops while sipping either hot or cold water.

This chat originally appeared on Shark Fin Hoops shortly before last night’s games were played.

Fresh from penning a cracking article about Wilson Chandler for NiuBBall, Edward Bothfeld swings by to talk playoff runs, how to stay true to the CBA but still get paid in the NBA, Guangsha’s malaise, All-Star selections and the best and worst jerseys in the league.

Andrew Crawford: First question, on a scale of 1 to 10, how stressed as a Guangsha fan are you right now?

Edward Bothfeld: I don’t want to put a number on it but I don’t think the Lions will win tonight or Sunday or next Wednesday, and if they are fortunate enough to make the playoffs, I don’t think they will last long. I don’t know what happened before that Qingdao game (the one that snapped their winning streak) but it hasn’t been the same since then. They aren’t playing with any heart- they were lucky to win against Bayi, a game that should have been a blowout. I hope I’m wrong though- tonight will be telling against Beijing

AC: I’m guessing its still the same problem- an over reliance on Wilson Chandler, or do you think there is an even deeper problem going on?

EB: Its the reliance on Chandler and Ramos. Coach Cleamons said at the press conference that on defense, teams are putting a lot guys on Chandler, which is why he is settling for a lot of outside shots. Basically, they haven’t been able to get into a rhythm. If some of the supporting cast could hit some threes, they would be set but Lin Chih-Chieh has really struggled shooting lately and Jin Lipeng can only play a few minutes a night so there’s nothing to take the pressure off of PJ and Wilson, who I think is ready to head home and get back to the Nuggets. Danilo Gallinari, who Chandler would compete for minutes with, is injured so there are a lot of game time available for Wilson right now.

AC: Yeah, the Gallinari injury has been a nightmare for my fantasy team but in real terms, Chandler is suddenly a lot more important for Denver. What sort of fall-out do you think there could be if Guangsha fail to make the playoffs or sneak in but then don’t play very well?

EB: Well, Chandler won’t be back next year and I doubt Cleamons will be either. I think PJ is signed for next season but Guangsha needs some national team players as well as some good imports in order to really make some noise, so if the season ends poorly, there will be a lot of turnover. If I were the GM, I would keep Lin around as well as Wang Zirui, who is the youngest player in the league at eighteen but has earned more minutes as the season has gone along.

AC: Its been a crazy season so far- previously mighty teams like Jiangsu and Bayi have struggled, Xinjiang blew the roster up but are coming back strong and Fujian and Shanghai are still in the playoff mix- do you think we could see any more shocks in the next three games?

EB: The only consistent thing about the CBA right now is Guangdong. It will be interesting to see how the NBA-bound guys play in these last rounds. The Guandong-Xinjiang game will be interesting, although I guess almost every remaining game has playoff ramifications so it’s time to see who’s for real and who isn’t.

AC: The CBA is probably delighted right now- they couldn’t have asked for a more dramatic ending to the regular season. As for the NBA-bound players, I can safely say that Smith is still going hard having seen him do his thing on Wednesday against Shanghai but if I was his agent, I would be going crazy right now- JR’s chasing a multi-million dollar contract and the last thing any normal person would be doing is trying to drive to the basket in heavy traffic or fighting for rebounds with 6″11 forwards. You have to give Smith credit, he’s still going for the win every game despite his itchy feet.

EB: It’s refreshing to see that though. Guys like Smith, Chandler and Brooks are playing for NBA contracts that will most likely set them up financially for life. If I were in their shoes, it would be difficult to know what to do; wouldn’t they feel foolish if one of them suffered a serious injury in one of the last games? Its tricky; there’s something to be said for honoring your CBA contract, but at some point you have to be practical and whether you like it or not, money is an important aspect of life.

AC: Indeed. Looking at Shanghai for a second, they are in seventh place right now. Do you think they’ll still be there after games against Jiangsu, Beijing and Tianjin. First and foremost, I desperately want them to make the playoffs but a lot of people have talked about finishing seventh and getting a Shanghai-Beijing series, which could be massive.

EB: The Jiangsu and Tianjin games should be winnable Beijing might be tough since it’s on the road against a very good team. Ultimately, I think the Sharks will be there and a Shanghai-Beijing series would be a lot of fun

AC: Yeah, an old timers vs. new money derby in the playoffs would be epic, especially after the complete mayhem of the Ducks’ last visit to the Yuanshen. Basically, I just want them to get to the postseason but facing Beijing would make it even sweeter. I’m guessing you saw the All-Star line-ups? Any thoughts?

EB: Well, J.R. Smith is a fan favorite and Marbury was always going to be a safe bet but generally speaking, I don’t put too much into All-Star games. That said, the jerseys are awesome.

AC: Yeah, I will be interested to see who makes the bench- I didn’t think any of the Sharks who got nominated (Liu Wei, Zhang Zhaoxu, Mike Harris) would make the starting line-up but the Chinese pair might slip onto the bench. Is there anyone from Guangsha you think might make the final cut- I’m guessing Chandler is going to be the other overseas player for the South but will anyone else from the Lions creep in?

EB: Maybe PJ? His sheer size and intimidation abilities are an all-star attraction

AC: Perhaps, no chance for Jin or Lin?

EB: Jin is a fan favorite but only plays 18 minutes a night and sometimes doesn’t have any energy at all- it would be different if Guangsha were at the top of the standings but they aren’t, so I don’t necessarily think they deserve to have a bunch of All-Stars.

AC: Alright, last question; we touched upon the awesome All Star jerseys- aside from your team, whose got the best jerseys in the CBA?

EB: I have always liked Zhejiang jerseys- that might be because I’m a Bulls fan back in the States though and they are the Golden Bulls here.I look forward to seeing them live in Hangzhou next Wednesday!

AC: Yeah, I like Zhejiang too but for different reasons ie. the preposterously bright colours. I also like the Fujian Sturgeons jersey but more for the improbable animal that they blaze across the chests. Bayi’s are pretty sweet too- its simple but effective. I would say that Tianjin’s are the worst though. Like the team itself, not very eye-catching and lacking ideas.

EB: If I remember correctly I think Qingdao’s were pretty bland.

AC: I don’t know, I can roll with a bit of Qingdao but that’s just my conservative British tastes coming through. Anyways, I think that’s us done. thanks for your time, man.

EB: No problem. Let’s do it again

AC: For sure. Do you have a prediction for tonight’s Guangsha game?

EB: I think either we win in a tight one or Beijing wins by 10.

AC: Well, good luck all the same.

EB: You too.

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CBA Round 29 Recap

February 5, 2012

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Guangsha – 69 @  Xinjiang – 99

Once towards the top of the standings, is Guangsha even going to make the playoffs? That’s the question after the Lions were blown out in Urumqi on Friday. After rebounding with a strong game in Round 28, Wilson Chandler reverted back to passively shooting jump shots, finishing 4-16 for 10 points.

The game was never close. Xinjiang’s Tim Pickett got off to a hot start and continued to stay aggressive on offense, scoring 35 points and grabbing 10 rebounds. Gani Lawal contributed with 15 points and eight boards and Mengke Bateer put in 15. The win is Xinjiang’s fourth straight and puts them in seventh place, while Guangsha drops to sixth.

Guangsha feeds of Chandler, who when he wants to be is the toughest individual matchup in the league. However, a long-term NBA deal likely on the table whenever he returns to the NBA, Chandler’s priority appears to lie within maintaining his health in preparation for his big payday.

Jon Pastuszek

Box Score

Shanghai – 108 @ Shanxi – 119

The Shanghai Sharks came, they saw, they got lit up. Shanxi’s high scoring duo of Marcus Williams and Charles Gaines did exactly what their guests were hoping they wouldn’t and blew Shanghai away with some red-hot shooting. After a plucky first half from the Sharks, the Shanxi Brave Dragons’ demolition men coolly stepped up a gear and promptly ripped the Sharks asunder with a devastating final twenty minutes of huge threes, marauding drives to the basket and some deft low post action. It was not pleasant viewing for a Shanghai fan.

Although the Sharks limped their way over the hundred-point mark themselves, the margin of defeat was telling and the visitors now make their way back to Shanghai after eventually losing 119-108 to a rampant Shanxi team that is almost certainly bound for the playoffs. Williams finished on 44 points, Gaines got 37 of his own whilst Ren Junhui’s 11 points meant he also got in on the double-digit party for Shanxi.

Meanwhile Mike Harris picked up a double-double of 37 points and 12 rebounds for Shanghai, Marcus Landry got 23 points and Liu Ziqiu continued his quiet resurgence with a gutsy 14 points but the Sharks now have to win four from their final five games to have any chance of making it to the postseason. Tough times just become a lot tougher.

Andrew Crawford

Box Score

Liaoning – 94 @ DongGuan – 107

DongGuan got 35 points and 16 boards from Shavlik Randolph and Josh Akognon had 27 as they beat visiting Liaoning by 13 at home. Thanks to Randolph’s activity in the frontcourt, DongGuan went +7 on the offensive glass and forced the visiting squad into 10-27 from the three-point line. The Jaguars, who have won just two road games the whole year, got nothing out of Josh Powell, who played only 16 minutes, picking up four points and three rebounds. At 14-13, they have put themselves out of the playoff picture and could slip further if they lose tonight at Fujian.

Jon Pastuszek

Box Score

Shandong – 115 @ Zhejiang – 121 (OT)

Alan Anderson shot an amazing 42 shots to tally 54 points, but his individual shootaround wasn’t enough for Shandong to come up with the win. J.R. Smith shot 29 shots to get 41, but Zhejiang’s balanced support in Josh Boone (19 points), Ding Jinhui (15) and Chang Chunjun (13).

Jon Pastuszek

Box Score

Jilin – 96 @ Fujian – 109 

Box Score

Tianjin – 112 @ Beijing – 122

Box Score

Qingdao – 97 @ Jiangsu – 92

Box Score

Bayi – 116 @ Foshan – 106

Box Score

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CBA Round 28 Reacp

February 3, 2012

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Qingdao – 110 @ Zhejiang – 122

 

J.R. Smith scored 60 points and broke a CBA single-game record with 14 threes. I’ll let the video to the rest of the talking.

Jon Pastuszek

Fujian – 132 @ Guangsha – 125 (2 OT)

Wilson Chandler’s 36-21 wasn’t enough to keep visiting Fujian from getting a much needed split on their Shanghai-Guangsha road trip to keep their playoff hopes very much alive. Zaid Abbas, Will McDonald, Anthony Roberson and Gong Songlin combined for an insane 121 points as only Zhou Qixin and Yang Genglin were the only other two players to score.

11-loss Guangsha now faces a critical road test at Xinjiang on Friday. A win will put them squarely in mess that is the CBA playoff race, a win will give them some breathing space.

Jon Pastuszek

Shanghai – 84 @ Xinjiang – 89

A Shanghai Sharks team got close but couldn’t win against a Xinjiang Flying Tigers side that showed flashes of real talent and menace but also looked brittle at times. Having stayed with the Flying Tigers throughout the game, a crucial ninety seconds decided everything. Firstly, Shanghai’s Mike Harris fouled out and Mengke Bateer converted his second free-throw from the foul to make the scores 82-82. A clutch three from Xirelijiang and then a lay-up form Shanghai’s Zhang Zhaoxu made it 85-84. With 17 seconds on the clock, the Sharks then managed to turn the ball over not once but twice and the Tigers confirmed victory in farcical fashion and that frankly was a little harsh on a visiting side that played with 100% effort.

Lawal scored 19 points and picked up 15 rebounds whilst Picket also got a 15 point, 12 rebound double-double. For Shanghai, Landry got a game high 20 points, Harris made 15 and Zhang got 10.

A tough loss for the Sharks mean that they fall out of the post-season places with another tricky away game (Shanxi Dragons) waiting for them on Friday. (What’s worse is that they’ve lost the tiebreaker to Xinjiang — their head-to-head record is even, but their head-to-head point differential, Xinjiang +1, gives them the edge in the event that they finish with the same record. You can thank that last steal by Pickett on Liu Ziqiu for that one. — Jon) Shanghai will need to regroup and play with the same zest against the Dragons that they showed in Urumqi if they are to have a shot at keeping their playoff dreams alive.

Andrew Crawford

Liaoning – 108 @ Guangdong – 122

34 points from Aaron Brooks and 28 from James Singleton gave the Southern Tigers a rare game of total import dominance, as the only Chinese players to check in with double figures were Zhou Peng and Zhu Fangyu. It’s Guangdong’s 10th straight win.

Jon Pastuszek

Jilin – 98 @ DongGuan – 120

Jilin makes it 0-2 on what will soon be an 0-3 Guangdong-DongGuan-Fujain road trip as they start to plan their spring off-season. And hey, maybe Jilin knows that more than we do — Cartier Martin only played 14 minutes and Osama Dahglas played 10. Wait, did I say off-season? I mean months and months of burning out their bodies with mindless practices. For the Chinese players.

DongGuan’s Josh Akognon continues his hot post-Spring Festival break with 31 points. If he stays hot, DongGuan will be a tougher team to beat come playoff time.

Jon Pastuszek

Shandong – 87 @ Bayi – 107

Foshan – 115 @ Shanxi – 129

Jiangsu – 99 @ Tianjin – 105

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CBA Round 27 Recap

January 31, 2012

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Fujian – 90 @ Shanghai – 94

A nervy Shanghai Sharks held on to beat the Fujian Sturgeons after a flurry of clutch three pointers pulled the home side away from danger in the closing seconds of the game. Anthony Roberson was a constant menace for the visitors and lit up the Sharks at times in the second half. A commanding performance from Liu Wei and some gutsy three-pointers from Wang Yong were critical to giving the Sharks victory but this was a game that could have gone either way in the crucial stages but for once, the luck was with Shanghai.

Roberson scored a game high 39 points that included 7 three-pointers, whilst Zaid Abbas (17 points, 16 rebounds) and Will McDonald (17 points, 11 rebounds) got themselves double-doubles. For Shanghai, both Liu and Mike Harris made 20 points, whilst Wang got 15, Marcus Landry scored 13 and Zhang Zhaoxu got 10 in an evening of high drama.

A relieved Coach Panaggio was happy with a tight victory but knows that away games against Xinjiang and Shanxi are coming round the corner and that his side can’t relax for even a second. ‘I’m very happy with the win but we were somewhat lucky’, he noted in a concise press conference. With the squad still adjusting to the loss of Ryan Forehan-Kelly, the Sharks’ boss was also quick to praise a number of players who have stepped up since the forward injured himself in December, particularly Liu Ziqui, who had a strong defensive game and made the crucial shot to ensure victory for the Sharks; ‘we’re a better team when he’s playing at the level he’s at [right now]‘. The Sharks’ will need all the big contributions they can get now that the post season is getting closer and closer.

Andrew Crawford

Box Score

DongGuan -109 @ Guangsha – 114

The battle of third and fourth place ended with a big home win by Guangsha thanks to a bounceback 28 point, 10 rebound effort by Wilson Chandler. Jin Lipeng, coming off his usual spot on the bench, had a much improved 18 point performance, while Lin Chih-chieh cashed in 23. P.J. Ramos clocked in with a double-double – 21 points and 11 rebounds.

Josh Akognon went off for 40 points, Shavlik Randolph had 29 points and eight rebounds.

With the win, Guangsha is now even with DongGuan in the loss column. But because DongGuan has a larger head-to-head point differential, they own the tiebreaker in the event that both teams finish the year with the same record.

Jon Pastuszek

Box Score

Zhejiang – 104 @ Tianjin – 112

In a shock upset, 14th placed Tianjin took out J.R. Smith and the Zhejiang Chouzhou Golden Bulls. In his first game for Tianjin, newly signed Herve Lamizana thrashed the visitors for 37 points and 12 boards. Donnell Harvey also got into the 30-10 act with 34 points and 12 rebounds.

J.R. Smith went for 37 points on a staggering 19-22 from the free-throw line, but once again it was his sister, Stephanie, who stole the show. Midway through the third quarter, she got into it with several Tianjin fans and before finally exiting, threw up two middle fingers to the entire stadium.

Zhejiang has now lost six out their last eight are currently out of playoffs sitting in ninth place.

Jon Pastuszek

Box Score

Jiangsu – 97 @ Beijing – 116

Jiangsu remains winless on the road and Beijing continues to take steps to lock up the No. 2 seed with plenty of time to spare in the 2011-12 season. Zhai Xiaochuan set a career high with 25 points, a nice accomplishment that was only made nicer by the 12 rebounds he snagged. As they have for most of the year, Beijing got it done with balanced scoring as five players put in double-digit point totals.

Still on the shelf with injuries, Chen Lei an Lee Hsueh-lin did not play. But their returns are expected within a week or two and when they do finally hit the court, they’ll give the Ducks a much needed boost in depth that they sorely lack at the moment.

Box Score

Shanxi – 110 @ Shandong – 125

The Brave Dragons’ Year of the Dragon got off to a terrible start in Shandong after they lost in convincing fashion to team all but mathematically eliminated from playoff contention. In one of the rare games where you’ll see both teams trot out an all Chinese lineup for the first quarter, Shanxi went into the intermission down 16 points before scurrying into the locker room at halftime down 25. Shandong’s Wu Ke, who is averaging 8.5 points on the season, looked like a superstar with a highly efficient 25 points on 7-11 shooting and 13 rebounds. Alan Anderson had 21 and Othello Hunter pitched with a double-double of 19 and 12.

Jon Pastuzsek

Box Score

Foshan – 94 @ Xinjiang – 103

Box Score

Jilin – 94 @ Guangdong – 107

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Qingdao – 103 @ Bayi – 91

Box Score

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Tianjin replaces David Harrison with Herve Lamizana

January 29, 2012

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While other teams were either on vacation or doing two-a-day practices during the Spring Festival, Tianjin Ronggang used the period to welcome back a familiar foreigner to the team.

In a move that was rumored for a while before officially coming to fruition just before the holiday, Tianjin released center David Harrison and signed forward Herve Lamizana as his replacement. This will be Lamizana’s fifth year in China and third with Tianjin. He played with Shandong for two seasons from 2006-08 before signing with Tianjin for both the 2009-10 and 2010-11 seasons.

In 24 games, Harrison averaged 15.5 points and 10.3 rebounds per game.

The timing of the move is odd. With a mere eight games left in the season, Tianjin is currently in 14th place with an 8-17 record and has no chance of making the post-season. Officially, team representatives are saying that the season ending injury to Asian import guard Rony Fahed, who broke his second, third and fourth metatarsal on his right hand in a game against Shanghai on December 28th, left the team without a reliable ball-handler. Lamizana, a versatile forward who plays on the perimeter, can help to offset that issue. Though Tianjin was in search of a new import after Fahed’s injury, they were initially optimistic that his hand would heal by the Spring Festival.

The hand did not heal, however, and the team was forced to make a move. Tianjin has gone 3-6 since Fahed has gone out of the lineup.

But even more odd than the timing is the decision to bring back Lamizana himself. After playing a full season for Tianjin in 2009-10, Lamizana came back last season to play under head coach Bob MacKinnon Jr. Playing alongside Lee Benson, the two never meshed with either each other or their Chinese teammates and the team managed only four wins in their first 26 games.

During Tianjin’s 27th game of the season, a road game against Shandong, Lamizana went 7-20 with 16 points and nine rebounds in a 97-87 loss. After the game, Tianjin announced that Lamizana would be released from the team immediately and gave no official explanation as to why.

Though Tianjin still hasn’t commented on the reason, Chinese media wrote that team management became convinced that Lamizana purposely threw the game for money so that his old team could make a final push for the playoffs.

Though it still floats around in Chinese basketball circles today, the rumor has never been officially proven. And with Lamizana now back to Tianjin, it seems as if the team doesn’t have much time for that story either.

Last year, Lamizana 24.4 points, 10.4 rebounds, 1. 9 steals and 3.6 blocks. He is currently tied for the CBA single game blocks record with Yao Ming and Sean Williams with 13.

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CBA Round 26 and Round 4 Make-ups Recap

January 23, 2012

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Round 26: (January 18th)

Zhejiang – 92 @ Beijing – 103

Stephon Marbury put down arguably the best single-game performance of the season — and his case for CBA MVP — with a super efficient 45 point, 12 rebound, 11 assist triple-double as the Ducks took out J.R. Smith and the visiting Golden Bulls in Beijing.

Losing by five heading into the fourth quarter, Beijing outscored their opponents 28-14 to snatch the win. Much of that was through Marbury, who put in two separate personal runs of five and seven straight points. Marbury, who played 43 minutes in all, turned the ball over only once, shooting 15-29 from the field and 10-12 from the free-throw line.

J.R. had himself a nice individual game with 39 points and eight rebounds, but only finished with one assist.

Jon Pastuszek

Box Score

Guangdong – 100 @ Guangsha – 97

Once considered title contenders, Guangsha slipped further down the standings after losing their sixth in seven games, with the latest loss being dealt by league powerhouse, Guangdong.

Up for most of the first half, Guangsha seemed poised to put their string of bad results behind them. But, Guangdong came out firing in the third quarter with 38 points to put them up by a comfortable margin before the home team made it slightly interesting in the fourth. Wilson Chandler continued his offense anemia, shooting a ghastly 1-10 from three en route to a ho-hum 24 points.

Aaron Brooks finished as Guangdong’s high scorer with 26, while Wang Shipeng and Zhu Fangyu did their job offensively with 24 and 23 points respectively.

With the win, Guangdong becomes the first team to clinch a playoff spot and once again look like the strong favorites to win the title.

Jon Pastuszek

Box Score

DongGuan – 97 @ Shanghai – 110

For now at least, normal service at the Yuanshen has been resumed as the Shanghai Sharks eased to victory over the DongGuan Leopards. Mike Harris returned to the line-up after the death of his brother and conjured up a sensation performance to help Shanghai beat their guests, 110-97. The away side struggled to contain their hosts’ forwards and Shavlik Randolph failed to get any momentum going in a game where he was mercilessly heckled by the home crowd from start to finish. The Sharks keep their winning record going into the New Year break and now stand at 13-11 with eight games to go in the regular season.

To top of an emotional night, a last-second substitution allowed Harris to get an ovation from the crowd, the coaching staff and the owner himself, Yao Ming as the game clocked faded to zero. The returning Sharks forward had picked up 38 points and 12 rebounds while Marcus Landry (24), Liu Wei (18) and Liu Ziqiu (14) also had themselves double-digit shooting nights. For DongGuan, five Leopards players also got significant hauls; Josh Akognon (24 points), Randolph (23), Qiu Biao (15), Qu Guan (11) and Zhang Kai (10).

In his press conference after the game, Dan Panaggio was keen to congratulate Harris on his gutsy performance, noting that the forward had arrived back in Shanghai at around 3:30pm that day and had got himself to the game 30 minutes before the tip-off. ‘He just wanted to get back to his team’, added the Sharks coach, before revealing that Zhang Zhaoxu had persuaded him to sub Harris off so that the American could get his ovation from the crowd. Equally, Panaggio looked relieved to have got the victory to keep the Sharks in contention for a play-off spot but was also keen to stress that there was still several crucial games to come once the season restarts on January 29th. ‘I’m grateful to have won this game…but our job is still in front of us and it is a difficult one’.

Andrew Crawford

Box Score

Xinjiang – 98 @ Shandong – 104

The Flying Tigers made it 0-2 on their two-game Shandong roadtrip, losing to a struggling Shandong team three days after getting spanked by Qingdao. Xirelijiang, who kept Alan Anderson under 10 points in the two team’s first encounter earlier in the year, wasn’t given a chance to guard the former Michigan State standout and Anderson responded with 32 rather effortless points. Othello Hunter pitched in with 22 points and 10 boards.

It was Xinjiang’s 11th road loss of the year, tying them for the worst road record in the league.

Jon Pastuszek

Box Score

Liaoning – 91 @ Jilin – 99

Liaoning’s inconsistency reared its ugly head again in Jilin after the Jaguars came up empty against non-playoff outfit Jilin on the road. Cartier Martin did it to the visitors with 38 points and seven rebounds. Osama Dahglas nearly missed out on a triple-double, going for 15 points, 11 rebounds and 9 assists.

Josh Powell, who has been the subject of constant rumors the last couple of weeks, managed only two points and nine rebounds. Though Liaoning has one of the more talented domestic rosters, they’ll need much more from their American big man if they’re to have any shot of advancing in the post-season in March.

–Jon Pastuszek

Box Score

Shanxi – 110 @ Qingdao – 106

Box Score

Bayi – 98 @ Tianjin – 110

Box Score

Fujian – 110 @ Foshan – 100

Box Score

Round 4 Make-Ups (January 20th)

Zhejiang @ Xinjiang

 

Xinjiang and Zhejiang played a very physical and intense match that ended with Xinjiang coming out on top. Gani Lawal, who sat for most of the first half after the Flying Tigers got off to a slow start offensively, came back with a vengeance and then some in the second, scoring 20 points and grabbing 21 rebounds, 14 of which came on the offensive end, in just 28 minutes. Tim Pickett had a nice game as well, finishing with 32-6-6.

Entertaining throughout, the game ultimately unraveled in the end for Chouzhou because Josh Boone and J.R. Smith both fouled out with over four minutes to play in the fourth quarter, the latter fouling out on an offensive foul. Frustrated at the referees, who let a lot of physical play under the basket slide, Smith whipped the basketball at the nearest referee, which resulted in his second technical of the game. He got his first earlier in the third quarter after he jawed back and forth with Lawal. Smith had a number of incredible individual plays, including an off-the-wrong-foot slam that he powered home after dismissing three defenders with a slick crossover. He finished with 41 points, but came up goose eggs in the assist department.

–Jon Pastuszek

Box Score (Chinese)

Bayi – 105 @ Shanxi – 109

Box Score (Chinese)

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CBA Round 25 Recap

January 17, 2012

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DongGuan – 101 @ Foshan – 99

The Leopards stayed in second place thanks to 40 points from Josh Akognon, 23 from Shavlik Randolph… and a translating error from Foshan.

With the shot clock off in the fourth quarter, the Dralions saw themselves down two with the ball. Foshan head coach, Jay Humphries Shi Liping, called a time-out to draw up a a last second play. The Dralions came out of the huddle and went pick-and-roll for Michael Maadanly, a play which resulted in a miss and ultimately the loss. But after the game, Humphries Shi told reporters that his team wasn’t supposed to run pick-and-roll — instead, Maadanly was supposed to pass to Marcus Haislip for the game winning shot — and blamed the miscommunication on the team’s translator.

Jon Pastuszek

Box Score

Guangsha – 92 @ Liaoning – 106

How do you follow up a season low 12 point performance on Friday night? If you’re Wilson Chandler, you kick up a notch with an eight point Sunday night on 3-12 shooting. The loss is Guangsha’s fourth in a row, a particularly head scratching development after the team had beaten every contending team but Guangdong over the first half of the season.

Rodney Carney had 29 for the winners, who were also helped by 18 points from han Dejun, 15 from Zhang Qingpeng, and 11 each from Liu Shunan, Yang Ming and Li Xiaoxu. Liaoning are now streaking to the tune of three games in a row. Liaoning’s 12-2 home record means that if they can get into the top four, they’ll have a very sizable advantage over their first round opponent.

Jon Pastuszek

Bayi – 98 @ Beijing – 112

Calling a win against Bayi a “bounce back win” is pretty redundant when almost every team in the league has bounced them around this year, but Beijing did get a much needed victory to keep the pressure on DongGuan in second place.

Randolph Morris lead all Duck scorers with 27, rookie Zhu Yanxi hit for 25, and Stephon Marbury ran wild with 24 points and 10 assists on only one turnover. Perhaps in a move aimed to save their best guns for another day, Bayi head coach Adijiang rotated 11 players, choosing to rest key starters Zhang Bo and Han Shuo for their upcoming game on Wednesday against 16th place Tianjin. In 26 minutes, Wang Zhizhi scored 27 and grabbed nine boards.

Jon Pastuszek

Box Score

Guangdong – 101 @ Shanghai – 85

Despite the noise from packed Yuanshen Gymnasium and a frisky first-half performance, the Shanghai Sharks couldn’t pull off an upset victory against the Guangdong Tigers. With Mike Harris out of the line up due to family reasons, the Sharks needed maximum focus from their remaining squad but after a solid start, but Shanghai condemned themselves to another defeat after a poor third quarter allowed the Tigers take control before going on to win by the resounding margin of 101-85.

By the start of the fourth quarter, the one-two punch of Zhu Fangyu and James Singleton had opened up a twenty point lead. The Sharks were fighting to keep their heads above the water and Guangdong’s 80-60 lead underlined the Tigers’ dominance. A furious Shanghai rally at the start of the quarter, led by Liu Wei’s 10 point flurry only served to enrage the champions further, and Singleton went on a mini-scoring spree of his own to punish the Sharks for their obstinacy. The former Clippers/Mavericks/Wizards forward had no qualms with baiting the crowd and at one point gestured to the Yuanshen to keep on booing him after perfectly sinking a brace of free-throws, neatly reflecting both the ruthlessness and swagger of the champions’ performance.

The final buzzer rang shortly afterwards and sparred the Sharks any further embarrassment considering that the scoreboard was already at 101-85 to Guangdong. For the Tigers, Singleton earned himself a double-double (27 points, 10 rebounds), as did Zhou Peng (16 points, 10 rebounds) whilst Zhu (21) and Aaron Brooks (17) made it into double figures from the floor. Marcus Landry made 23, Liu got 19 and Tseng Wen-ting picked up 15 but once again, Shanghai were kicking themselves after another bad third quarter and the Sharks’ losing streak now stands at three-in-a-row.

–Andrew Crawford

Xinjiang – 97 @ Qingdao – 115

Xinjiang’s miserable season continued with a miserable loss on the road to Qingdao, pushing their miserable road record to 3-10. Lester Hudson contributed the most to the Flying Tigers’ sorry performance on both ends of the court by baptizing their entire backcourt with nine splashes from downtown en route to 41 points overall. Playing against his former team, Xue Yuyang also got into the act by netting 20 points, 12 of which came from behind the arc.

The Flying Tigers have been simply atrocious on defense recently, giving up 100 or more points in four of their last five games. Forget championship, now officially out of a playoff position at 11-11, they’ll need to fix things up on that side of the ball if they even want to make the playoffs in March.

Jon Pastuszek

Box Score

Tianjin – 102 @ Shanxi – 119

Box Score

Shandong – 95 @ Fujian – 116

Box Score

Jiangsu – 93 @ Zhejiang – 116

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