Tag Archives: Cao Fei

FIBA Asia Cup 12-man roster announced

September 13, 2012

0 Comments

Team China’s trip to Tokyo for the Asia Cup got off to a boring start last night.

Yesterday, the Chinese Basketball Association has announced the 12-man roster for the 2012 FIBA Asia Cup.

Wang Zhelin and Guo Ailun headline a team that is completely comprised of players aged 22 and under. Going up against teams that will have veteran senior level players, head coach Fan Bin stressed to reporters that this China team won’t be judged on results. Instead, the tournament will be used as a way for China’s next generation of National Team players to gain experience in preparation for the 2016 Olympics.

In part, there’s truth to all of that. But as people who are familiar with Chinese basketball know, China will still be looking for a decent finish. If all they really cared about was the experience, would they have taken Guo Ailun, who has been out of action since he sprained his ankle on September 3rd and went so far to tweet on September 9th that it was still in a large amount of pain? The answer is pretty obvious, I think.

Things are already off to a rough start for the Chinese, however. According to the Beijing Morning Post, after arriving in Tokyo last night, the team was forced to wait at the airport for two hours for their bus to arrive. By the time their vehicle had arrived, it was well past midnight.

Hmmmmmm….

The full roster:

Center

Wang Zhelin (Fujian)
Sun Zhe (DongGuan)
Zhang Dayu (Zhejiang)

Forward

Yu Changdong (Xinjiang)
Wu Ke (Shandong)
Cao Yan (Bayi)

Guard

Guo Ailun (Liaoning)
Duan Jiangpeng (Shanxi)
Sui Ran (Shandong)
Wang Zirui (Guangsha)
Zhao Tailong (Fujian)
Cao Fei (Zhejiang)

Continue reading...

Zhejiang Chouzhou is getting a new coach

April 16, 2012

0 Comments

Ding Wei is out at as Zhejiang Chozhou head coach. The club announced the news through an official release earlier today.

From Sina Sports: ”Over the last two seasons, Ding Wei has been very conscientious in his work and has dedicated himself completely to the team, and has transformed the spirit of the team in a very big way, especially during the 2010-11 season when he lead the team to its best finish in team history — fifth place.”

According to the release, Ding Wei will go to the United States Europe to study and improve his skills as a coach.

After making the playoffs last season, the Golden Bulls had high expectations going into this season. With Josh Boone, Ding Jinhui and Cao Fei all returning, the team signed J.R. Smith to a lucrative deal with the hopes of a top-four finish. Despite some controversy between Smith and the team, the Golden Bulls got off to a good start and looked like a lock for a playoff run.

But, like many of the NBA-to-CBA players who signed in China with the belief that there’d be no NBA season, Smith’s play declined considerably once the lockout suddenly ended in December. As a result, Zhejiang’s record took a dive and the team ended missed out on the post-season, finishing a disappointing 15-17.

No replacement for Ding has been named as of yet.

Continue reading...

Marcus Williams Interview

March 10, 2012

1 Comment

Thanks to slicing drives like this, Marcus Williams has been putting lots of numbers and wins in his first season for Shanxi. (Photo: Osports)

Sometimes, you don’t know what you have until it’s gone.

After learning that lesson midway through last season, the Zhejiang Golden Bulls are having to re-learn it from the comfort of their home living rooms as they watch their former star, Marcus Williams, carry one of their rivals deep into the post-season. For Williams though, who is starring for the Shanxi Zhongyu Brave Dragons this season, the success in his new digs is just the continuation of the pattern he’s set for himself over the last three years: winning games, putting up huge numbers and establishing himself as one of the CBA’s best import players.

At 25 years of age, Williams has had a unique road to CBA stardom. A high school star in Seattle, Williams chose to attend the University of Arizona, where he spent two years before being drafted in the second round by the San Antonio Spurs in 2007. After spending most of 2007-08 season in the D-League with the the Spurs’ affiliate, the Austin Toros, Williams was signed by the Los Angeles Clippers for the rest of the season in March 2008. Unable to secure a deal in the NBA, he spent the next season back with the Toros and earned himself All-NBDL First Team honors and an NBDL All-Star selection.

But feeling the need for a change, Williams went in a totally different direction with his career — he went across the Pacific Ocean to China where signed a contract with Zhejiang in the fall of 2010. Younger and less experienced than most of the league’s older import players, the then 23 year-old Williams bucked the trend and averaged 26 points, eight rebounds and four assists while nearly pushing the Golden Bulls into the playoffs.

That apparently wasn’t good enough in the eyes of Zhejiang management, however, and the team opted to bring in longtime NBA veteran Mike James to replace Williams. Like many NBA-to-CBAers last season, James didn’t last long and Williams was brought back a mere nine games into the season. With Williams in the lineup, Zhejiang erased their 2-7 start to finish the year 17-6. By year’s end, the Golden Bulls were back in the playoffs and Williams had amassed averages 29.6 points, 8.2 rebounds and 5.4 assists.

After the mess that Williams cleaned up, you’d think the team would have learned their lesson by signing him in the off-season. They didn’t.

Despite two great seasons, Zhejiang felt once again that the grass was greener over by the NBA fence and elected to sign a locked-out J.R. Smith over Williams. No longer wanted in Yiwu, he skipped to Taiyuan to sign with the Brave Dragons. By the time the smoke cleared on the 2011-12 season, J.R. and the Golden Bulls went 15-17 and missed the post-season. Williams and the Brave Dragons went 20-12, made the playoffs for the first time in franchise history, and are now playing for a trip to the CBA Finals.

Not surprisingly, Williams has been a huge part of Shanxi’s historical season. Improving on what was already an extremely refined and versatile offensive game, Williams has become even more dominant than before to become arguably the best player in the entire league. A 6-7 walking triple-double, he averaged a CBA career high 31.9 points per game this season in addition to 4.9 rebounds, 3.8 assists and 2.5 steals. What he shoots from the field is somewhat of a mystery as different websites have listed his three point percentage anywhere from 50 to 90 percent. So while we don’t know the exact number, we do know this: Boasting excellent balance and shot selection, he doesn’t miss too much and his field goal percentage is definitely over 50 percent.

And in the post-season, he’s been missing even less. In Shanxi’s seven playoff games, he’s hit for 35 points in four of them. In the semi-finals alone, he’s averaging 38 points on over 60 percent from the field and 95 percent from the free-throw line. Down 2-1 against Beijing, Shanxi will need a win and some more of the same from Williams on Sunday night to force a deciding Wednesday Game 5 in Beijing.

Yet, his biggest bucket came off the court when the two-time NiuBBall All-CBA First Teamer sat down with NiuBBall to discuss the playoffs, his development as a player in the CBA, life in Taiyuan and more.

NiuBBall: Let’s talk first about your series with Beijing. In some leagues, the pace of the game really slows down in the playoffs in comparison to the regular season. But with you and Beijing, especially the last two games, it seems like the pace has actually gotten faster. What are some of the differences you’re noticing in this series versus the regular season or even your first round series against Shanghai?

Marcus Williams: Our first playoff series was against Shanghai, and they totally slowed the pace down. Once we were able to advance and get to Beijing, we were so anxious to speed the game up and play at a fast pace. I think everyone is being really aggressive, we’re shooting more free-throws. I just think that’s our style of play. But at the end of the day, we need to get stops, especially at the end of games, and I think that’s what hurt us in Game 2 and Game 3. We just weren’t able to focus on the defensive end and they had two big nights.

NiuBBall: You mentioned the defense already, what were some other differences between Game 1 and the last two games in Beijing?

MW: Well, in Game 2 Stephon [Marbury] got going really early and I think that gave the rest of their team a lot of confidence. He got into the paint, he was able to kick to shooters and those guys were making shots. It makes it a lot harder because now instead of worrying about one player, you’re worrying about three or four players. Number #20 [Zhai Xiaochuan] had a good game. Stephon obviously had 25 in the first quarter and I think in our first game it was something like 12. So, that’s something that hurt us. He’s the leader of their team and when he goes, they go.

Game 3 was a tough game we fought back from down 15 points in the second quarter and it was a close game all the way until the fourth. I think we ran out of gas a little bit. Having to come back from 15 took a lot out of us. There is definitely some things we can improve for next game. We need to rotate on matter to their shooters and do a better job keep Stephon out of the paint. But, Game 4 is in Taiyuan and obviously it’s a win or go home for us, so I think we can bring it next game and send it back to Beijing. And in Game 5 anything can happen.

NiuBBall: Obviously he’s put two huge nights back-to-back on you guys. When you’re game planning for him, are you trying to limit him or limit his teammates? Or is it a combination of the two?

MW: It’s going to be more of keeping him out of the paint so that he has to do it more himself. He wants to get in there, draw the help and kick out. That’s what he prefers. I think he’d rather be a facilitator than go out and score 40 a night, so we definitely want to close out on their shooters. But if he’s being aggressive, then you have to focus on him because he can have big nights.

NiuBBall: A lot of your team’s offense is geared towards getting you and Charles [Gaines] the ball. It’s certainly worked, you guys scored the most points in the league this year, but do you ever see it as a challenge to get your teammates involved on that end of the floor?

MW: With me and Chuck playing together for a while, obviously we played all of this year and then we played some D-League together [in Austin], I’m real familiar with him. But, no I don’t really see it as hard to get our teammates involved. We have Lu Xiaoming at the point, he can run the show. I think it was hard at the beginning of the season. I think they hadn’t really gotten used to having us both there. But, as the season progressed and once the second-half of the season began, they got a lot more comfortable and started to trust us and I think that really helped our team, it allowed us finish up the regular season really strong.

NiuBBall: You first played with Chuck in the D-League with the Austin Toros, now you’re teammates again in Shanxi. What’s it been like reuniting with  him in China this year?

MW: It’s been great. Me and him both live in Houston back in the States, and I was talking with him this summer to figure out what he was going to do this season. It’s a big key to have an American on your team who’s game you’re at least a little bit familiar with. And he’s a good friend of mine, so it’s made it really easy just coming to Shanxi and having the quick transition, to be able to build a relationship with him and build an on-court chemistry with him. I know he’s the type of player who goes after it every night, so that makes my job a lot easier. If I have an off night, he can fill in for me and vice versa.

NiuBBall: Playing in China, how important do you feel that foreigner-foreigner relationship is?

MW: I think it’s really important, at least on the court. Obviously, you can’t control the other things, but on the court you have to have a foreigner who you can feed off of or at least you can play decently with because it’s just you two out there. You’re going to be spending a lot of time with him, he’s probably the only other guys on the team who can speak English, so you just need kind of a comfort level. Then, there’s going to be a lot of pressure on both of you to perform, so to be able to help each other is key.

NiuBBall: The last two years, you were with Zhejiang, now you’re almost done with your first year in Shanxi. Talk about both teams and how they differ from one another.

MW: In Zhejiang, we definitely played a slower game. As far as the basketball, it was all good. Obviously my first year, we weren’t able to get into the playoffs, but my second year we got better and advanced to the playoffs and we played really well. Shanxi is really fast paced. Both teams are really young, both had good players. In Zhejiang we had Ding [Jinhui] and Cao Fei, in Shanxi we have Lu Xiaoming, Duan [Jiangpeng], Zhang Xuewen and the kid from Guangdong [Ren Junhui]. So both teams are kind of similar as far as their makeup. That’s why I think it was a pretty easy adjustment.

NiuBBall: Shanxi is a little unique in the fact that the team hired a Chinese head coach at the beginning of the year and then brought in an American assistant, Beau Archibald. How has that dynamic worked and what’s it been like to have Coach Archibald around?

MW: It’s been great, Beau has really helped on the defense as far as picking up on the schemes and adjusting to what teams are doing. Also, it’s been good to talk to a coach who has his eyes out there on the floor, who can see something and come directly to talk to you and say “Hey, this is what I’m seeing out there.” And he’s familiar with the U.S. style of basketball, so the things I’m comfortable with he can help to put into the offense. It’s just been really good.

NiuBBall: You came to the CBA when you were pretty young. For various reasons, I think it’s tough for younger players to adjust to this league. How were you able to come in as 23 year-old and not only adjust, but play at a high level?

MW: I’m not going to lie, my first time here was hard. That first year I think is the one that’s going to tell you if you can make it here or not. My first year, I got really sick out here, I got some kind of virus. I think I missed two or three games. Then there’s the food. I just tried to tough it out because I think the basketball was good for me. I was able to come out and get a lot of minutes. Coming from the NBA and the D-League, in the D-League I was able to get a lot of minutes, but the money’s not there. In the NBA, I wasn’t really playing a lot. But to come here, you’re able to play your game freely and you can take that leadership role. For me, as long as the basketball is good, I’m good. That’s how I roll.

NiuBBall: This year, obviously the big story was all of the NBA guys coming to China during the lockout. What kind of impact do you think it had on the CBA this year, and how do you see it affecting the league’s development in the long-term?

MW: I think it was great. I think a lot of attention was brought to the CBA. Having guys like Aaron Brooks, Wilson Chandler, J.R. Smith, these aren’t small-time NBA players, these are legitimate NBA guys who have logged years and have had success. The talent level really went up this year. And I think it just brought a lot of eyes from really everywhere. I think some big time players in Europe might start coming over, like [Will] McDonald. I think a lot of players are really going to start wanting to come out here and play. There’s a lot of freedom out here. The CBA tries to mimic the NBA a little bit, so the basketball is not bad. So I think for guys who are similar to me, as long as the basketball is good they’ll be good. In Europe, it’s a slower game, you don’t get as many minutes and you don’t really get to shoot the ball as much. So, I think the CBA is only going to keep going up.

NiuBBall: You just mentioned the freedom and the minutes as some of the positives about playing in the CBA — your numbers have gotten better every year, do you think this league is a good place to come and improve? Do you feel like you’ve improved over the last three years?

MW: I do. I think the only way you get better is by playing. If you’re sitting on the bench and you’re not getting a lot of playing time, sure you can work on your game away from the court, but eventually it’s going to have to translate to game situations. Obviously, the competition level in the CBA is lower than the NBA, but if you’re a guy that wasn’t getting a lot of playing time, I think you can come here and play and you go on and play somewhere else, like the NBA, I think you’ll be more confident in your game and I guess just more tricks up your sleeve just because you’re able to show all of that in this league.

NiuBBall: One thing that you’ve improved on, at least on paper, is your three-point shooting. Every website has a different percentage, on the CBA official stat tracker you were shooting a perfect 100% for a while. So let me ask: Do you know what you’re shooting from the three point line this year?

MW: [Laughing] No, I really don’t. I know the last two years I was between 45 and 50 percent, so I would guess around there. I remember when they had me shooting 90 percent [earlier in the year] and people were calling me saying they couldn’t believe it. I missed two threes in 10 games. It was too unrealistic, but it gave us some good laughs though.

NiuBBall: Mike Harris said in a recent interview that he felt you are the best import in the league and that you have NBA talent. I know in talking with other players and coaches around the league, he’s not the only person who feels that way. Is the NBA on your radar at all, getting back a goal for you?

MW: I don’t really think about the NBA too much. I had times where I was in the NBA and tried it. But, I love playing basketball. I like to be out there and play, that’s what I’ve loved to do ever since I was a kid. I would obviously love, best case scenario, to be in the NBA playing minutes. But if that doesn’t happen I’d rather be playing somewhere else and getting minutes. That’s just who I am. Now if an opportunity came along, if I couldn’t pass it up, I have a son and a family and I’d love to be home, I’d take it. But until that happens, I’m happy in the CBA.

NiuBBall: You’re a China vet, what’s your favorite city in China?

MW: I like Hangzhou. While I’m in China, I definitely want to feel like I’m in China. In Shanghai or Beijing, you kind of get lost in the ambiance, it’s still kind of like the States. But Hangzhou, they have some pretty nice restaurants, the lake is real nice… It’s kind of between Beijing and a more traditional Chinese city.

NiuBBall: So you like to go out and go see the different cities.

MW: Yeah, I like to go out and see a city and explore a little bit. I don’t really go out, but while I’m out here I might as well.

NiuBBall: What do you do in Taiyuan?

MW: Well, we’ve been really busy during the season, but there’s a couple of restaurants I go to. Pizza Lovers and 1950 are two good restaurants. But as far as sight-seeing in Taiyuan, I haven’t really had the chance to go out and do that. I’ve heard of a couple of places, I think they have a real famous temple out there about an hour away, but we’ve been really busy once the season kicked off so I haven’t really had the time.

NiuBBall: Marcus, thanks for the chat and good luck with the rest of the playoffs.

MW: Thanks.

Continue reading...

CBA Round 2 Recap

November 25, 2011

1 Comment

DongGuan New Century Leopards – 73 @ Zhejiang Chouzhou Golden Bulls – 101

J.R. Smith turned in a workmanlike performance as Golden Bulls did away with the Leopards 101-73. Josh Boone put up 24 points including a couple of crowd pleasing dunks, and 13 rebounds, whilst Smith, now returned from his brief elopement to Beijing, scored a modest 16 points plus five assists and six rebounds.

Forward Cao Fei also got in on the act, scoring 21 points and the Bulls can be pleased with a clinical dismantling of a DongGuan side that posed little threat to Zhejiang attempts to get their opening win of the season at the second time of asking.

Box Score

Andrew Crawford

Xinjiang Guanghui Flying Tigers – 80 @ Shanxi Zhongyu Brave Dragons – 102

Kenyon Martin’s debut for Xinjiang was spoiled by a feisty Shanxi squad in what was by far the most shocking result of the young season so far. With Quincy Douby’s replacement, Patty Mills, having only arrived yesterday, the three-time runner-ups were short a second import and it showed almost immediately. Mills will be in the lineup tonight against Bayi, but on Wednesday, without a capable point guard, Xinjiang was unable to get any consistent offensive flow and struggled with their execution, turning the ball over 18 times.

They also didn’t defend. The Brave Dragons shot 56% from the field, including 7-13 from deep. Duan Jiangpeng, who was left off Bob Donewald Jr.’s National Team roster this summer, made a point — 20 of them to be exact — in an offensive display that Donewald will likely not forget anytime soon. Charles Gaines added 25 points and 14 boards, including 11-11 from the free-throw line, and Marcus Williams added 20.

For Xinjiang, Martin finished with 16 points and 9 rebounds in 40 minutes. Meng Duo scored a team high 19.

Box Score

Jon Pastuszek

Guangdong Hongyuan Southern Tigers – 105 @ Jiangsu Nangang Dragons – 90 

Guangdong’s Chinese players came to the fore as the Tigers saw off Jiangsu by fifteen points. Yi Jianlian picked up a tasty double-double with 30 points and 17 rebounds. Zhou Peng (21),Wang Shipeng (19) and James Singleton (13) were equally full of hustle, helping their side overwhelm a Dragons outfit that had six players who scored in the double figures.

Mardy Collins’ 17 points with 6 assists and the same number of rebounds, was the pick of Jiangsu’s players, but Guangdong handled their business on the road and look to make Beijing victim number three of the 2011-2012 season on Friday.

Box Score

Andrew Crawford

Shanghai Dongfang Sharks – 95 @ Shandong Kingston Gold Lions – 98 (OT)

Shanghai’s Mike Harris had the performance of Round 2 with a dominant 39 point 18 rebound stat-line, but Shandong sent Yao Ming and co. to an 0-2 start in overtime. Alan Anderson paced the winners with 32 points, 15 rebounds and 4 assists while Othello Hunter continues to prove that he will be a force to be reckoned with on the offensive glass. He snatched five down — 13 overall — and chipped in with 19 points.

For Shanghai, “Max” Zhang Zhaoxu had a strong performance, 13 points, 14 rebounds and 3 blocks. Like last season, the Sharks find themselves in an early 0-2 hole to start the year. Shandong goes to 2-0.

**For a much better recap, check out Andrew Crawford’s detailed account over at Shark Fin Hoops.

Box Score

Jon Pastuszek

Other Standout Results

Beijing won their second game in a row thanks to a Zhai Xiaochuan tip-in at the buzzer against a capable Liaoning squad at home at Capital Steel Stadium. That man Stephon Marbury continues to bring the heat in cold, windy Beijing. Starbury got himself 30 points and eleven rebounds before fouling out in his team’s 102-101 victory over Liaoning and probably owes Randolph Morris and Chen Lei a drink after the game for helping the Ducks see the game out with hauls of 24 and 26 respectively. Josh Powell’s 24 points wasn’t enough to help the visitors, who now have a victory and a loss for their two-game troubles. – Box score

Wilson Chandler was only ‘very good’ against Qingdao Eagles, putting up 28 points and 12 rebounds as his Guangsha side lost on the road, 94-88, as Lester Hudson put on another fine showing, this time scoring 37 points and picking up 8 assists and 8 rebounds. — Box Score

Other Round 2 Results

Bayi Fubang Rockets 111-106 Fujian SBS Sturgeons

Box Score

Tianjin Ronggang Golden Lions 117-114 Jilin GBT Northeast Tigers

Box Score

Continue reading...
Yeni bir olusum icine girdigimiz son gunlerde sektorde o kadar cok ipsiz sapsiz turemeye basladi ki artik porno seyretme keyfi kalmadi millette. Tabii bir de bunun ustune yeni yasalar ve yeni sacmaliklar eklenince insan iyice zivanadan cikip artik bilgisayar yerine mobil porno tercih ediyor. Bir de tum bunlardan ciktigimizda insanlarin son donemlerde cok secici olarak kaliteli ve porno izleye basladiklarini goruyoruz. Tabi biz sizlere yine de izlemeniz icin rus porno izlemenizi oneriyoruz.